Darrow Miller and Friends

Category: History

Total 61 Posts

Why Narratives Have Become Pervasive

This is post 3 of 6 in the series “Narratives” Narratives are pervasive today because of a worldview shift to postmodernism The concept of “narrative” we’ve been exploring in this series is not new, but today narratives have become commonplace. They are pervasive. You name the major issue of the

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The Destructive Power of Narrative: An Example from American History

This is post 2 of 6 in the series “Narratives” Do you really know American history? What impressions come to mind when you think about the Puritan colonists who settled in New England? How would you describe them? As a child, my thoughts about the New England colonists were shaped

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A Fundamentally Transformed America

In the previous post, The Meaning of America, I attempted to distill a list of the core ideas and values that gave rise to our distinctly American culture—that uniquely American way of doing things that was eloquently described by de Tocqueville in the 1830s and is still recognizable today. I called this “the

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The Meaning of America

What does it mean to be an American? I’ve been giving a lot of thought to this recently.  Unlike most nations, America* is not defined by a shared ethnicity. We come from all over the world. Some are recent arrivals, others have lived here for hundreds of years, and some

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Sign of a New Reformation?

Could a new reformation be on the horizon? We often talk about and pray for much needed revival, a movement of God that would lead to reformation in the West. We speak of a post-Christian world, a post-modern world. We are watching what happens to societies that sever their Judeo-Christian

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Healthcare and Development: Learning from the Mennonite Colonies

Years ago, some Mennonite colonies settled in the “Green Hell” of Paraguay’s Gran Chaco. Their story is an illustration of how God works through people to heal the land and build a nation. In his book, Like A Mustard Seed: Mennonites in Paraguay, Mennonite author Edgar Stoesz tells this fascinating

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Further On Chile and Milton Friedman

Our dear friend Lianggi Espinoza from Chile continues his dialog with us around our Dec 14 post, “Out of the Mouth of Bono: Economics and Freedom.”  In Lianggi’s latest comments he writes: About the interview with Friedman. The tenth commandment is do not covet. And communists do that. Their system

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Egypt: Where the President Apologizes for Muslim Abuse

In Egypt the man of peace is sowing peace again. On Thursday, Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi repeated last year’s visit to an Orthodox Christmas Mass. He showed up, unannounced, in Cairo’s Coptic Cathedral where Egyptian Pope Tawadros II was celebrating Christmas Eve Mass. Al-Sisi has a pattern of such

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The Magna Carta: 800-Year-Old Taproot of Christian Freedoms

British historian and author Philip Quenby has just finished a five-part documentary to celebrate the 800th anniversary of Magna Carta. The series examines Magna Carta and its legacy in politics, science, society, law and warfare. “Magna Carta Unlocked” can be streamed here. Quenby argues that the development of modern civil

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How American Women Have Blessed the World

Throughout his book Democracy in America, Alexis de Tocqueville identifies the things that have made the United States a unique and, yes, an exceptional nation. But what is the most important thing Americans have done? What has led to the great flourishing of this nation? De Tocqueville concludes it is

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