Darrow Miller and Friends

Category: History

Total 56 Posts

Healthcare and Development: Learning from the Mennonite Colonies

Years ago, some Mennonite colonies settled in the “Green Hell” of Paraguay’s Gran Chaco. Their story is an illustration of how God works through people to heal the land and build a nation. In his book, Like A Mustard Seed: Mennonites in Paraguay, Mennonite author Edgar Stoesz tells this fascinating

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Further On Chile and Milton Friedman

Our dear friend Lianggi Espinoza from Chile continues his dialog with us around our Dec 14 post, “Out of the Mouth of Bono: Economics and Freedom.”  In Lianggi’s latest comments he writes: About the interview with Friedman. The tenth commandment is do not covet. And communists do that. Their system

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Egypt: Where the President Apologizes for Muslim Abuse

In Egypt the man of peace is sowing peace again. On Thursday, Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi repeated last year’s visit to an Orthodox Christmas Mass. He showed up, unannounced, in Cairo’s Coptic Cathedral where Egyptian Pope Tawadros II was celebrating Christmas Eve Mass. Al-Sisi has a pattern of such

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The Magna Carta: 800-Year-Old Taproot of Christian Freedoms

British historian and author Philip Quenby has just finished a five-part documentary to celebrate the 800th anniversary of Magna Carta. The series examines Magna Carta and its legacy in politics, science, society, law and warfare. “Magna Carta Unlocked” can be streamed here. Quenby argues that the development of modern civil

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How American Women Have Blessed the World

Throughout his book Democracy in America, Alexis de Tocqueville identifies the things that have made the United States a unique and, yes, an exceptional nation. But what is the most important thing Americans have done? What has led to the great flourishing of this nation? De Tocqueville concludes it is

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American Women and the Power of Domestic Life

As we continue exploring the strength of American women (see part 1 and part 2) we note that de Tocqueville regarded their role in domestic life as an indication of nobility. As for myself, I do not hesitate to avow that, although the women of the United States are confined within the

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Are American Women Superior?

Our desire in this short blog series (go here for part 1) is to examine the higher elevation of American women than women in other nations. We seek to do this through commenting on some of the observations of the French historian, Alexis de Tocqueville, and his American contemporary, maternal feminist

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A Prophet for Our Generation?

I have often said that the man who mentored me, Francis Schaeffer, was a prophet in our generation. Fifty years ago, he spoke very clearly about where we were as a church and as a culture. He correctly predicted the future. Schaeffer was not a prophet in the sense of

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Vision and Technology Turned Desolation Into Abundance

Abundance can come from the most unlikely places. In the 27 years I worked for a relief and development organization, I heard two clear messages too often: From impoverished indigenous peoples the message was, “We have no resources, we are poor and there’s nothing we can do about it.” I heard

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The Most Historically Significant Sculpture You’ve Never Seen

A renewal of the founding principles of the US is past due; no big headline there. But we’ve come to a pretty turn of things when the “largest solid granite sculpture in the U.S.”—a magnificent tribute to our Pilgrim founders—is virtually invisible, and at the same time, the anchor of

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